VENUS DE MILO

Noblesse oblige.

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ANTIKYTHERA

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Sometime before Easter 1900, Elias Stadiatos, a Greek sponge diver, discovered the wreck of an ancient cargo ship (150-100 BC) off Antikythera island at a depth of 42m. Sponge divers retrieved several statues and other artifacts from the site,
including a mechanical computer designed to calculate astronomical positions.

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No earlier geared mechanism of any sort has ever been found. Nothing close to its technological sophistication appears again for well over a millennium, when astronomical clocks appear in medieval Europe.

At the photo below a reconstruction of the mechanism.

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More information HERE.

THE DOMUS AUREA

The Domus Aurea (“Golden House”, in Latin) was a vast palace built by the Emperor Nero in the heart of ancient Rome after the great fire in 64 AD which destroyed a large part of the city.

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The 300-room structure, now mostly underground, takes its name from the gold leaf that once covered many of its walls.

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ANCIENT CAVE PAINTINGS DEFACED WITH GRAFFITI

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Ancient cave paintings about 8,000 years old at a world heritage site in the Sahara desert have been defaced with graffiti.

Vandals scrawled their names on top of the artworks in French and Arabic.

View full article HERE.

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LEPTIS MAGNA

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Leptis Magna was a prominent city in Roman Libya.

Little is known about the old city, but it appears to have been powerful enough to repel Dorieus’ attempt to establish a Greek colony nearby in c. 515 BC. A 4th to 3rd century BC necropolis was found under the Roman theatre.

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Leptis Magna remained as such until the reign of the Roman emperor Tiberius, when the city and the surrounding area were formally incorporated into the empire as part of the province of Africa. It soon became one of the leading cities of Roman Africa and a major trading post.

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In c. 647 due to an Arab invasionthe city was mostly abandoned except for a Byzantine garrison force and a population of less than 1,000 inhabitants. Under Arab domination Leptis disappeared: by the 10th century the city was forgotten and fully covered by sand.

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VOLUBILIS

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Volubilis is a partly excavated Roman city in Morocco, commonly considered as the ancient capital of the kingdom of Mauretania.

It developed from the 3rd century BC onward as an Amazigh, then proto-Carthaginian, settlement before being the capital of the kingdom of Mauretania. It grew rapidly under Roman rule from the 1st century AD and gained a number of major public buildings in the 2nd century, including a basilica, temple and triumphal arch.

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Salvar

Two Pharaonic statues uncovered by archaeologists in Cairo

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Archaeologists have found two Pharaonic statues dating back more than 3,000 years in a muddy pit in a Cairo suburb.

The statues, discovered on Thursday on wasteland between crumbling apartment blocks, are thought to represent pharaohs from the 19th dynasty, which ruled from 1314 to 1200 BCE.

Full article HERE.

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NIMRUD

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Nimrud is the Assyrian Neo-Aramaic name for the ancient Assyrian city of Kalhu (the Biblical Calah), located 30 kilometres south of the city of Mosul, and 5 kilometres south of the village of Selamiyah, in the Nineveh plains in northern Mesopotamia.

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Archaeological excavations at the site began in 1845, and were conducted at intervals between then and 1879, and then from 1949 onwards. Many important pieces were discovered, with most being moved to museums in Iraq and amongst at least 76 museums worldwide (including 36 in the United States and 13 in the United Kingdom).

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The Assyrian king Shalmaneser I (1274 BC–1245 BC) built up Kalhu (Nimrod) into a major city during the Middle Assyrian Empire (1365-1050 BC). However, the ancient city of Assur remained the capital of Assyria, as it had been since c. 3500 BC.

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The city gained fame when king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC) of the Neo Assyrian Empire (911–605 BC) made it his capital at the expense of Assur. He built a large palace and temples in the city that had fallen into a degree of disrepair during the Dark Ages of the mid 11th to mid 10th centuries BC.

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JERASH

Jerash is the site of the ruins of the Greco-Roman city of Gerasa, also referred to as Antioch on the Golden River. Ancient Greek inscriptions from the city as well as literary sources from both Iamblichus and the Etymologicum Magnum support that the city was founded by Alexander the Great or his general Perdiccas, who settled aged Macedonian soldiers there. This took place during the spring of 331 BC, when Alexander left Egypt, crossed Syria and then went to Mesopotamia.

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NUBIA

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Nubia is a region along the Nile river located in what is today northern Sudan and southern Egypt. It was one of the earliest civilizations of ancient Africa, with a history that can be traced from at least 2000 B.C.

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Nubia was home to some of Africa’s earliest kingdoms. Known for rich deposits of gold, Nubia was also the gateway through which luxury products like incense, ivory, and ebony traveled from their source in sub-Saharan Africa to the civilizations of Egypt and the Mediterranean. Archers of exceptional skill provided the military strength for Nubian rulers. Kings of Nubia ultimately conquered and ruled Egypt for about a century. Monuments still stand—in modern Egypt and Sudan—at the sites where Nubian rulers built cities, temples, and royal pyramids.

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Note: (There of those pyramids are reconstruted).

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